Thursday, February 26, 2015

Article - No, You’re Not Imagining It: 3 Ways Racial Microaggressions Sneak into Our Lives

This is a good article however again and as per usual there is no mention of Native American/First Nations people.  A heads up on this because the term is called "statistical genocide."  We as Native American/First Nations people are left out of statistics, research projects, studies, articles, reports and on and on.  Raising awareness on this will continue indefinitely as long as the dominant/majority/mainstream culture continues to treat us the invisible minority.  Nonetheless this is a good article on racial microagressions.  From my point of view we deal with colonial racial microaggressions.  Racism can occur towards us as a people (insults, stereotypes, discrimination) or racism towards our lands and waters (environmental racism). 

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No, You’re Not Imagining It: 3 Ways Racial Microaggressions Sneak into Our Lives

Have you ever experienced someone insulting you in a way that felt a little bit racist, but you couldn’t quite figure out why?

Were you worried about “reading too much into it,” “being too sensitive,” or taking offense when none was intended?

When this happened, did you let the other person know you were hurt, only for them to become distressed or defensive? Have you been reluctant to say something when you felt this way because your opinions have been silenced or ignored in the past?

Like many other people of color (POC) living the US, I’ve felt all of these things. For some of us, feeling this way is the norm and, without realizing, we put up a wall to protect ourselves from the damage that comes with it.

These uneasy, uncertain feelings can be the result of what Chester M. Pierce, a psychiatrist and professor, coined racial microaggressions – originally defined as the racist insults directed at Black people from non-Black Americans.

Dr. Derald Wing Sue, who also writes about racial microaggressions, explains them as the “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.”

Microaggressions are “micro” because they often happen in small, private situations, yet their effects often impact us in massive and dangerous ways.

Over time, being on the receiving end of these everyday (yet often unrecognizable) attacks can lead to depression, social isolation, and lowered confidence. Because we’ve been conditioned to question ourselves and not the perpetrators or the situations, we begin to wonder if our own feelings and experiences are legitimate.

Sometimes, without understanding what we’re doing, we even internalize those aggressions and use them to police both our loved ones and ourselves.

As a kid, I often corrected my mother’s pronunciation of English words. Though she did have a Chinese accent, she didn’t need me to tell her how to speak English – she’d taught English as a second language for more than a decade.

I didn’t realize that by doing that, I was communicating that her foreign accent not only made her English different, it made it wrong. And like so many others, I had no idea I was regurgitating racist ideology (practicing internalized racism).

While small acts of internalized racism like mine go unnoticed all the time, there are too many occasions where the victim is just too shocked to say anything in the moment.

Whatever the reason, it amounts to letting racism off the hook. When we allow these small incidences to keep happening, we are allowing racism, in general, to remain a part of our culture.

As Dr. Sue goes on to state, the perpetrators of microaggressions are often unaware of how they may be offending or hurting others.

It’s important for us to remember that just because a perpetrator of racism is clueless (or in denial) about the impact of their words doesn’t mean that their actions were any less violent or that the impact of that violence is changed.

Monday, February 16, 2015

Music: Chase & Status - Alive ft. Jacob Banks

 
 
Published on Dec 4, 2013
'Alive' Feat. Jacob Banks
Taken from the new album Brand New Machine OUT NOW
iTunes - http://po.st/BrandNewMach

Shot on The Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana, USA. Many thanks to the whole Blackfeet Nation and The Crazy Dogs Society for making us feel at home there.

CREW:
Writer/ Director -- Josh Cole
DoP -- Luke Jacobs
Production Company -- Les Espoirs
Producer -- Lundi Shackleton
Commissioner -- James Hackett
Director's Rep -- Otis Bell @ OB Management
Associate Producer -- Jake Bowers
Line Producer -- Allison Whitmer
Casting Manager/ Production Assistant -- Sterling HolyWhiteMountain
Sound Recordist / Sound Design -- Nick Davies
Focus Puller/ DIT Operator -- Chris McGaughey
Hair + Make-up / Prosthetics -- Kate Dixson
Octocopter -- Josh Lambeth and Noel Lucas @ Birds Eye Productions, Phoenix

Location / Unit / Horse Wranglers -- THE CRAZY DOGS Rick Ground, Sheldon Carlson, Jay Young Running Crane, Johnny Ground, Leland Ground, Leon Rattler, Larry Ground, Wally Salem, Jason Paul.

Friday, February 13, 2015

Poem: Reporting Live From the 1842 Treaty Territories

It's a little cold up here,
Should I reach for that beer?
Or hang my laundry on the door?

I can't see straight,
I can't feel my heart,
My hands are cold,

There is a truck parked out there on the lawn,
We haven't seen the sun for days,
Centuries,
What can you do about the factory of your mind?
Environmental injustice all around,

I can't fight no more,
I can't see straight,

There is nothing for miles in the void of my soul,
This land unheard,
These waters,
A thirst,
A hunger,

Cultural retrofits,
That make-shift dangle that sways in the wind,
Broken,
Broke,
There is a shame we don't want to feel,
So we hide away,

Mattress on the floor,
It's not comfortable here,
There wasn't a doily or lace,
Curtains were ripped,
Soiled with tears,
We exited through the door and left our heart on the front steps.

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Poem: River Ancestors Crossing

Our ancestors crossed this river,
As a little girl you ran along the path that lead back to your ancestors,

The traffic went north and south,
But you were connecting amongst it,

There was a sound,
A sound in the soul,

The point led to a direction.
That led to a meeting,

The heart was divided among treaty territories,
Grieving,
Silently,
Painfully,

Policies divide the soul,
Identity on the cross,
Nail in arm,
Nail in foot,

You are tied to this,
This persecution,

Light on,
Light off,

Sorrowful tunes,
Up and down the corridor,
The Woodward Corridor,
The Grand River Corridor,

Asleep,
Chords abound,
The notes fall on trees,
Laying tobacco down,

The heart is not a distribution,
Not an industrial production,
Not a futile design,
Not an assembling of a broken-ness,
But a manufacturing of constellations,

The heart cannot be distributed,
Packaged,
Ignored.